Loading

Chemical Engineering

Course Offerings

Course Offerings 2016-17

Please consult your supervisor before choosing courses. For a listing of all courses across campus, please click here for the School of Graduate Studies calendar. If you identify a course outside of Chemical Engineering that interests you, it is your responsibility to contact the department and instructor to determine if the course is being offered.

For Courses Offered at Royal Military College click HERE. For Queen's Chemistry's graduate courses, please go HERE.  For CHEM801 lecture times, please click HERE.

To register for a course at RMC, complete and submit the application form.

Course offerings in Chemical Engineering at Queen's University are listed below. For a downloadable version, please click here.

NOTE: Courses are either term-length (12 weeks = 3 units) or modules (6 weeks = 1.5 units). Not all courses are offered in every session.

CHEE 801 (CHEE 418)
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Strategies for Process Investigations

The statistical design of experiments and the analysis of data in process investigations are considered. Empirical modelling of process behaviour is studied. Applications of factorial and fractional factorial experimental designs in screening studies and methods of response surface exploration are examined. Traditional North American approaches to quality and productivity improvement are compared with those practiced in Japan. (Jointly offered with CHEE-418, with additional assignments.)
B. Peppley
PREREQUISITE: CHEE-209 or equivalent. Exclusion CHEE-418.

IMPORTANT - An overview of the course will be given in the first tutorial.

CHEE 810
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Fuel Cell Systems: Design and Analysis

The course will examine the design of fuel cell systems for a variety of applications ranging from large multi-megawatt stationary power systems to milliwatt scale portable electronics systems. Examples will be drawn from actual demonstration and pre-commercial prototype systems operating on a range of fuels including conventional hydrocarbons with integrated external fuel processing subsystems, anaerobic digester gas with external clean-up and preprocessing, natural gas fuelled systems with direct and indirect reforming, direct methanol fuel cells and hydrogen fuel cells. The design of combined heat and power systems (CHP) for large scale industrial applications and for small-scale residential applications will also be examined. In each of these case studies the impact of system configuration and individual component performance on efficiency will be examined and strategies for optimizing performance and minimizing complexity will be developed. In addition, the effect of system design on greenhouse gas emissions will be considered. The course will consist of three design projects of increasing complexity and a final examination. Students will be expected to give a presentation on their final design project.

B. Peppley

Permission of the instructor.

CHEE-827
Offered in Fall 2016-17

System Optimization

A survey of optimization problems is made and mathematical procedures for their solutions are discussed. Comparisons of optimization techniques for various classes of problems are made using industrial examples and computer studies. Both linear and nonlinear programming methods are studied. Topics include the role of optimization, definitions of objective functions and constraints, conditions for existence of an optimum; one-dimensional strategies; analytical procedures for unconstrained and constrained multi-dimensional problems, numerical procedures for unconstrained and constrained multidimensional problems, and introduction to multistage optimization.
X. Li
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the instructor

Tuesday's and Thursday's from 3:45-5:15pm beginning September 13th, 2016.  Dupuis Hall Room 311

CHEE-828
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Polymer Reaction Engineering

The fundamentals of polymerization kinetics are reviewed. The equations for batch and continuous flow reactors are developed and used in the calculation of polymerization rate and polymer quality measures. Process parameters which affect reaction rate, chain composition and molecular weight distribution are examined, and the design of polymer reactor systems is discussed. Consideration is also given to the problems of reactor design in heterophase polymerization.
R.A. Hutchinson

Tuesday's from 1:30-3:00pm and Wednesday's from 2:30-4:30pm.  Dupuis Hall Rm 311
Information session to take place at 1:30pm on Tuesday, September 13, 2016.

CHEE-874
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Tissue Engineering

This course is designed as a graduate level introductory course in tissue engineering: the interdisciplinary field that encompasses biology, chemistry, medical sciences and engineering to design and fabricate living systems to replace damaged or diseased tissues and organs. Topics to be discussed include: tissue anatomy, basic cell biology, cell scaffolds, cell sources and differentiation, design considerations, diffusion and mass transfer limitations, effects of external stimuli, bioreactors, methods used to evaluate the engineered product(s), and implantation. Case studies of specific tissue engineering applications will also be discussed. Students will be required to participate in, as well as lead, discussions on the course material and relevant journal articles. No previous background in biology is required.
Three term hours.
L. Fitzpatrick

CHEE-897
Mandatory Course

Seminar

Graduate students working on theses must give a seminar on their research. All graduate students enrolled in this course must attend at least 70% of seminars per term. Grading is a Pass/Fail.

CHEE-898

Master's Project

For M.Eng. students only, this is a course which involves a laboratory research project. Students are expected to find a professor to supervise them in a laboratory-based project within their research group. The student receives two course credits (6 units) for successful completion. Grading is a Pass/Fail.

CHEE 899
Mandatory for M.A.Sc. students

Master's Thesis Research

CHEE-909 Module (CHEE460)
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Colloid and Surface Science (I)

Various established theories on Colloids (e.g., DLVO, XDLVO) will be analyzed and subsequently used as tools towards the understanding and prediction of phenomena relevant to contact angles, surface wetting, emulsion or particle dispersion stability, and surfactant self -assembly.(1.5 credit units)

 A. Docoslis

(1.5 units)

CHEE-910 Module (CHEE460)
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Colloid and Surface Science (II)

This course provides an in-depth examination of selected topics in colloids of great interest to sciences and technology, such as emulsion stability, adsorption, particles electrokinetics and light scattering. In-class discussions and presentations, literature reviews, and individual projects, will provide graduate students with the solid fundamental knowledge and critical thinking required to approach problems related to these phenomena in a rigorous manner. This is not intended to be an introductory course in Colloids. Prior knowledge of Colloids and Surface Science principles is required. (1.5 credit units)


 A. Docoslis

(1.5 units)

CHEE-990 Module
Offered in Fall 2016-17

Structure-Property Relationships of Polymeric Materials

This six-week graduate module provides students with background in physical polymer science as it relates to the formulation of materials to satisfy engineering applications. Starting from the characterization of molecular weight and composition distributions, the fundamentals of phase transitions, solubility, adhesion and thermo-oxidative stabilization are discussed.


 M. Kontopoulou

(1.5 units)

CHEE 999
Mandatory for Ph.D. students

Ph.D. Thesis Research

CMAS 801
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Topics in Applied Sustainability

The first lecture of CMAS 801 Topics in Applied Sustainability will be given Thursday January 12 from 10:30 to noon in McLaughlin Hall Room 312. The lecture will be given by Dr. Jewiet of Mech Eng and Dr. Peppley of Chem. Eng. will give an overview of the CMAS program in the last 25 minutes of the lecture. Students interested in possibly taking this course are invited to attend. If you are interested but unable to attend you can contact Dr. Peppley, Dupuis Rm 211 for more information. Applied sustainability is the application of science and innovation to meet human needs while indefinitely preserving the life support systems of the planet. This course provides an overview of the field with particular focus on implementation of engineering solutions. The course will be divided into four sections in which the technical and policy‐related issues will be explored:

1) Sustainable Energy Technologies
2) Sustainability and Fresh Water Systems
3) Sustainable Resource Management
4) Implementation of Policies to Enable Technology Transition

The course consists of a series of lectures related to each of the technical areas by professors from Mechanical Eng, Chemical Eng, Civil Eng and Mining as well as a module specifically on Policy. The lecturers are experts in a range of sustainable technologies.

B. Peppley

CHEE 803 (CHEE 412)
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Transport Phenomena

Basic concepts, generalized control volume analysis and balance equations. Constitutive equations, kinetic models, thermodynamic considerations, and prediction equations for transport properties. Coupled transport processes: Onsager's theory; forced diffusion; and thermo-chemical, thermo-electric, and electro-chemical effects. Special phenomena in biological and macromolecular systems. Phenomena at surfaces. Effects of flow and chemical reaction. Analogies between energy, material and momentum transport. Examples in the analysis of complex problems.
A. J. Giacomin

CHEE 821 (CHEE 434)
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Process Control II

This is a second course in process control techniques. Topics covered will include: frequency response methods for stability analysis and controller design, deadtime compensation (e.g., Smith predictor), feedforward/ cascade control, the Internal Model Control formulation, introduction to multivariable control, and interaction analysis using the concept of relative gain. Specific applications to chemical processes will be presented. (Offered jointly with CHEE-434, with additional lectures and assignments.)

M. Guay

PREREQUISITE: CHEE-319 or permission of the instructor.

CHEE 872
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Polymeric Biomaterials

This course is designed to appeal to students in all fields of this interdisciplinary field, from biomechanics to polymer chemistry. It will provide a thorough background in the underlying fundamental biological and polymer science principles involved in the use of polymers as medical materials. Topics include surface and bulk polymer properties, applications of polymeric biomaterials, the biological principles that dictate host response to a material, and biopolymer degradation.

 B. Amsden
 
Permission of the instructor.

CHEE 884
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Bioremediation

Bioremediation as an option to treat contaminated soils, ground water, fresh water and the marine environments. Advantages and disadvantages of bioremediation compared to nonbiological processes. Factors affecting choice of in situ or ex situ processes. Assessment of biodegradability; biostimulation vs. bioaugmentation; mineralization vs. partial degradation; factors affecting microbial activity (choice of electron acceptor, toxicity of pollutant, C/N/P ratio, co-substrates, soil humidity, pH and temperature); bioavailability of pollutant. Biodegradation of specific contaminants (eg. diesel fuel, polychlorinated biphenyls, dyestuffs, aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons) will be studied in detail.

 J. Ramsay/P. Champagne

CHEE-897
Mandatory Course

Seminar

Graduate students working on theses must give a seminar on their research. All graduate students enrolled in this course must attend at least 70% of seminars per term. Grading is a Pass/Fail.

CHEE-898

Master's Project

For M.Eng. students only, this is a course which involves a laboratory research project. Students are expected to find a professor to supervise them in a laboratory-based project within their research group. The student receives two course credits (6 units) for successful completion. Grading is a Pass/Fail.

CHEE 899
Mandatory for M.A.Sc. students

Master's Thesis Research

CHEE 901 Module
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Principles and Applications of Polymer Rheology

Rheology provides a valuable tool for the assessment of the processability of polymers in various operations, as well as the identification of their structure. This 6 week (3 hours/week) module will discuss the fundamental relations between the rheology and structure of polymers and the principles of rheometry. (1.5 credit unit weight)

Lectures: Wednesday or Thursday 19:00-21:50h, 311 Dupuis Hall
Syllabus

A.J. Giacomin
(1.50 units)

CHEE 912
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Applied Lab-on-Chip Technologies

This 6 week (3 hours/week) module will provide an overview on the latest developments, fabrication

techniques, and principles of operation of contemporary micro- and nanotechnologies used in lab-on-chip (LOC) type platforms. Small-scale subunit operations required in LOC systems, equally relevant across several disciplines in both life sciences and engineering fields, will be covered in detail. The knowledge acquired in these topics will be used during the last part of the course to analyze the design of LOC-based systems in key applications in different areas including biosensing, biotechnology and emerging energy technologies.

C. Escobedo

PREREQUISITE: none; (1.50 units)

CHEE 927 Module
Offered in Winter 2016-17

Global Optimization

This 6‐week course introduces global optimization principles and methods for nonconvex continuous or mixed‐integer programs, which can arise from a wide range of process systems engineering problems. The course consists of three parts. The first part discusses convex sets, convex functions, and Lagrangian duality theory. The second part introduces classical branch‐and‐bound based global optimization methods, along with convex relaxation and domain reduction techniques. The third part gives an overview of decomposition based large‐scale global optimization. This course, although placed in the Department of Chemical Engineering, is designed for graduate students from across Queen’s University.

X. Li

Prerequisites: CHEE 827 or permission by the instructor (1.5 units)
Schedule: Wednesday 4:30pm - 5:30pm  Friday 2:30pm - 4:00pm  
Dupuis Room 311

CHEE 999
Mandatory for Ph.D. students

Ph.D. Thesis Research

CHEE-807
Not offered in 2016-17

Current Topics in Chemical Engineering

Selected topics in chemical engineering including chemical reaction engineering, combustion, biochemical engineering, process control, environmental engineering, applied statistics, polymer reaction engineering, polymer processing, fluidization and turbulence. Only topics not covered in other graduate courses will be included. Topics will vary depending on the instructor(s).

Course Sub-Title - To be announced

(3 lecture hours per week)

To Be Announced
PREREQUISITE: Permission of the Instructor.

CHEE 809
Not Offered in 2016-17

Colloid and Surface Phenomena

The course provides in-depth coverage of the fundamentals of colloidal interactions (e.g., stabilisation, adsorption, self-assembly) and the techniques currently applied for their assessment. Current and emerging colloids-related technologies, with emphasis on nano-scale engineering (self- and directed-assembly of nanostructured materials, photonic crystals, sensors) will also be covered.

CHEE-811
Not Offered 2016-17

Mathematical Modeling of Chemical Processes

The steps that are required to build comprehensive mathematical models are examined. These steps include: definition of the intended model use; formulation of model equations; determination of model parameters from correlations and experimental data; parameter sensitivity and estimability analysis; solution of model equations using numerical techniques; model validation; and potential model applications. While the focus is on the development of fundamental and semi-empirical models, empirical modeling techniques are also discussed. Students complete a mathematical modeling project related to their research interests, and are expected to have taken undergraduate courses in differential equations, statistics and reaction engineering. This course is aimed at students working in a variety of research areas where mathematical models are important. Process examples are selected from: reactive distillation, heat transfer, polymerization,bioreactors, reformers, and fuel cells.
K.B. McAuley
Permission of the instructor.

CHEE 822 (CHEE 434)
Not Offered in 2016-17

Model-Based Control

The course focuses on the use of explicit process models for multi-variable controller design. Linear and nonlinear control approaches are discussed in both discrete and continuous time formulations. Stability, performance and robustness issues are addressed. The role of observers for state estimation is considered.

M. Guay
PREREQUISITE: CHEE-319 and -821 or equivalent.

CHEE-824
Not Offered in 2016-17

Nonlinear Regression Analysis and Applications

The role of statistical design and analysis in chemical process modelling; justification of least squares estimation; geometrical interpretation; algorithms for nonlinear least squares estimation; role of transformations; analysis of multiresponse data; experimental designs for model discrimination; experimental designs for precise parameter estimation.
P.J. McLellan
PREREQUISITE: CHEE-418/801 or equivalent.

CHEE-825
Not Offered in 2016-17

System Identification

The course focuses on the theory and application of linear time series methods for system identification. Time domain and frequency domain methods for analyzing dynamic data will be presented. Standard process plus disturbance models encountered in the identification literature will be investigated from both statistical and physical perspectives. Methods for structural identification, incorporation of exogenous variables, parameter estimation, and inference and model adequacy will be examined in detail. The design of dynamic experiments and incorporation of model uncertainty into the intended model and use, such as prediction or control, will be discussed. Assignments will include the analysis of industrial data sets. Dynamic modeling using neural networks and nonlinear time series methods will be introduced.
T. Harris
PREREQUISITE: CHEE-418/801 and CHEE-434/821 or equivalent.

CHEE 835
Not offered in 2016-17

Turbulent Diffusion in the Environment

Turbulent diffusion from both air and water emission sources are considered in this course. Fundamental concepts of diffusion and the statistical theory of turbulent flows are reviewed. Topics include simple modelling systems, dispersion in shear flows, line sources, time averaging of diffusion phenomena and the effect of density gradients.

CHEE 837
Not Offered in 2016-17

Transport & Kinetics with Application to Fuel Cells

The fundamentals of transport phenomena and reaction kinetics are considered and applied to fuel cells, with a view to a mechanistic understanding of fuel cell operation and limitations.  Material covered includes the basic axioms of mechanics (conservation of mass, momentum, energy and charge) presented in indicial notation and applied to porous media.  Emphasis is placed on the description of porous materials and the implications of porous media on transport, including the notion of effective transport coefficients.  Ion transport in solid and polymer electrolytes due to electrochemical potential differences is considered.   Diffusion models covered include Fick's law, Stefan Maxwell and Knudsen.  Electrochemical reaction kinetics and mechanism are covered including rate-limiting steps, exchange current density and the fundamental definition of over potential.  The course will include individual projects.

CHEE 882
Not Offered 2016-17

Bioreactor Design

This course examines the important factors in the design and operation of stirred tank bioreactors. A variety of biokinetic models are examined and used in the design of ideal and non-ideal bioreactors. The effect of the rheology of fermentation broths on mass transfer, mixing, power requirement, etc. is considered, along with Residence Time Distribution Analysis as a tool for quantifying non-ideal behaviour. Novel fermentor designs and immobilized enzyme/cell systems are discussed. Scale-up criteria are examined.
A.J. Daugulis
PREREQUISITE: CHEE-380 or equivalent courses or experience.

CHEE 883
Not Offered in 2016-17

Bioseparation Processes

Downstream processing techniques are studied which exploit the unique properties of proteins and which can separate a particular protein from a multicomponent protein mixture. Areas to be covered include the separation and purification of proteins by precipitation, by adsorption and in solution. Specific industrial and clinical bioseparation procedures, such as ultrafiltration and dialysis, will also be considered.
B.A. Ramsay
PREREQUISITE:
Permission of the instructor.

CHEE-885
Not offered in 2016-17

Current Topics in Biochemical Engineering

The course surveys recent advances in Biochemical Engineering, through lecture material and seminars based on recent published advances, critical analysis and in depth review of recent published literature, academic and industrial guest speakers outlining advances in their respective research areas and through student presented seminars on assigned papers or topics.
R. Neufeld

CHEE-887
Not Offered in 2016-17

Cellular Bioengineering

This course will focus on applied cellular and molecular biology for the development of cell-based therapeutics in regenerative medicine. Emphasis will be placed on how engineering principles can be applied, in combination with an understanding of mammalian morphogenesis and physiology, to control and manipulate cellular responses in vitro and in vivo.

CHEE 890
Not Offered in 2016-17

Advanced Polymer Structure, Properites and Processing

The first half of the course examines the elements of polymer science that relate to engineering applications. The second half examines polymer processing operations with an emphasis placed on the analysis of polymer flow. Specific topics include the rheology of thermoplastic melts, viscoelasticity, constitutive equations and polymer blends.

CHEE 902 Module
Not offered in 2016-17

Bulk and Solution Polymerisation Processes

This course is intended to help the student to understand how the fundamentals acquired in CHEE 828, are used in the design and operation of melt or solution polymerisation processes of different types (chemistries, operational modes, etc.) Emphasis will be placed on reactor design and operation, but separation technology for product purification will also be studied. Case studies of specific commodity polymers will be used to illustrate the important concepts.
Instructor
(1.50 units)

CHEE 903
Not Offered in 2016-17

Polymerisation in Dispersed Media

This is a product-focused course that will include use different (non-polyolefin) concrete examples to help the students understand the reasons for producing polymer in dispersed media, the types of product one can make and the relationship between process operation and polymer structure. Emphasis is placed on reactor design, advanced modelling of dispersed phases systems, and issues related to industrial production such as characterisation, scale-up and control.
Instructor
(1.50 units)

CHEE 906 Module
Not Offered in 2016-17

Entrepreneurship for Chemical Engineers

This graduate course module focuses on entrepreneurial opportunities in chemical engineering. Students evaluate the commercial potential of a technology or opportunity of their choice. This may be from his or her individual research work or research group; or alternatively, a chemical engineering application of interest. Assessment includes business opportunity screening, IP issues, market and competitive analysis, regulatory and legal issues and financial analysis. Students integrate engineering and business planning, make decisions in highly uncertain and unstructured environments and communicate their ideas to a variety of audiences, including professional venture capitalists and successful high-tech entrepreneurs. Various speakers with experience in the field of technology commercialization and entrepreneurship will speak to the class to offer their expertise. Opportunities exist to link some course activities to GreenCentre Canada.
Instructor:
(1.50 units)

CHEE 907 Module
TBD: Not/Offered in 2016-17

Current Topics in Chemical Engineering - Module

Selected topics in chemical engineering including chemical reaction engineering, combustion, biochemical engineering, process control, environmental engineering, applied statistics, polymer reaction engineering, polymer processing, fluidization and tubulence. Only topics not covered in other graduate courses will be included. Topics will vary depending on the instructor(s).

Course Sub-Title: Microscale Transport Phenomena

D. Barz

PREREQUISITE: permission of the instructor
(1.50 units)

CHEE 908 Module
Not Offered in 2016-17

Green Engineering - Module

Principles of green engineering as they apply to chemical process engineering will be introduced. It is designed primarily for chemical engineers and chemists. A chemical sciences background is required. The course will focus on the principles of applying green chemistry principles to process design, scaleup and development, as well as to the modification of existing processes, to make them less environmentally impactful.

M. Cunningham

PREREQUISITE: none
(1.50 units)

CHEE 911
Not Offered in 2016-17

Microscale Transport Phenomena

This 6 week (3 hours/week) module will provide in-depth coverage of microscale transport phenomena motivated by the emerging fields of Microfluidics and Lab-on-a-Chip. During this course, students will intensify and expand their knowledge of the fundamentals of heat, mass, charge and momentum transfer with emphasis on microscale geometries. The difference of macro- and microscale transport phenomena and the limitation of classical mechanics will be highlighted by scaling analysis. Additionally, an introduction into the fundamentals of selected electrohydrodynamic phenomena will be given.

CHEE 991 Module
Not Offered in 2016-17

Introduction to the Processing and Rheology of Polymeric Materials

This six-week graduate module examines polymer processing operations. Specific topics include extrusion and injection moulding, modeling approaches, polymer blends and composites. Particular emphasis is placed on the analysis of polymer flow. Principles of the rheology of thermoplastic melts and rheometry are presented. (1.5 credit unit weight).
Exclusion: CHEE-490