Chemical Engineering

Queen's Chemical Engineering student in the lab

Society relies daily on products such as fuel, pharmaceuticals, advanced composites, semiconductors, magnetic and optical storage devices, agricultural products, light-weight materials, coatings, synthetic fibers and personal care products. Chemical Engineers develop new advanced materials and design the processes that convert raw materials into value-added products.

Chemical Engineering is a broadly based engineering discipline, which combines the study of mathematics, chemistry, physics and biology, with engineering science, design, and economics. Students learn how to design safe, efficient, environmentally-friendly, sustainable and economical processes and products. They also acquire direct experience with pilot-scale chemical process equipment and simulators.

If you have questions, please contact our Undergraduate Program Assistant:

Liann Joanette
Tel: 613-533-6000 x74829
Email: liann.joanette@queensu.ca
Office: Dupuis Hall, Room 201

Chemical Engineering Course Calendar
How to Apply

Queen's Chemical Engineering offers options in Chemical Process Engineering and in Biochemical Engineering. Depending upon their interest, students can choose elective courses in the following areas: biochemical; biomedical; environmental; process systems engineering; energy; materials.

Chemical Process Engineering

Chemical Engineers are in demand in almost every imaginable sector of the economy. Many start their careers as process engineers, working in the design and operation of manufacturing plants, and then progress to key management positions in their firms. Some move into consulting or technical sales positions. Chemical Engineers also move into non-engineering careers such as law, medicine, management and finance.

Biochemical Engineering

Biochemical Engineering is an expanding field where chemical engineers link chemical process knowledge to biotechnology areas. As a Biochemical Engineer you might develop an economical process to commercialize a newly developed pharmaceutical product by a genetically engineered microorganism, you may manage or design a wastewater treatment facility to meet environmental norms or you may remediate an already polluted area.

Hear faculty, students, and alumni talk about the Queen's Chemical Engineering program in this short video:


  • What is Chemical Engineering?

    Chemical Engineering is the most universal and versatile of engineering disciplines. Chemical Engineers apply physical sciences (chemistry, physics) and biological sciences together with mathematics to

    • Design processes which convert raw materials or chemicals into value-added materials.
    • Develop new advanced materials.
    • Design chemical, biochemical, biomedical and biotechnology-based processes for large-scale manufacture

    Chemical Engineers are in demand in almost every imaginable sector of the economy. Many start their careers as process engineers, working in the design and operation of manufacturing plants, and then progress to key management positions in their firms. Some move into consulting or technical sales positions. Chemical Engineers also move into non-engineering careers such as law, medicine, management and finance.

    Biochemical Engineering is an expanding field where chemical engineers link chemical process knowledge to biotechnology areas. As a Biochemical Engineer you might develop an economical process to commercialize a newly developed pharmaceutical product by a genetically engineered microorganism, you may manage or design a wastewater treatment facility to meet environmental norms or you may remediate an already polluted area.

    Chemical Engineers:

    • Seek new sources of clean energy, manage renewable and non-renewable energy resources and develop sustainable processes.
    • Treat harmful waste and emissions, develop environmental remediation techniques, and purify drinking water.
    • Develop materials and products including petrochemicals, foods, consumer goods, pulp and paper, agricultural products, polymers, pharmaceuticals
    • Design life-saving devices such as the artificial kidney and angioplasty catheters
    • Provide know-how for chemical processing of computer chips and integrated circuits in the electronics industry and nanotechnology sectors

Need help finding your way through Queen’s and beyond? Get major-specific advice on academics, extracurriculars, networking, international opportunities and career development all in one place. This map provides suggestions - you don’t have to follow all the recommendations. Use it to plan ahead, and find your own way at Queen’s!

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Chemical Engineering Major Map