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Chemical Engineering

CHEE371

CHEE371 : Mitigation of Industrial Pollution

Personnel

Instructor

Louise Meunier305louise.meunier@queensu.ca78048

TAs

Nathan MullinsDupuis B16mullins.n@queensu.ca
Siavash Pourzeyhali Miankooh17spm3@queensu.ca
Elizabeth Claudio PachecanoDupuis B1616ecp@queensu.ca

Course Description

Sources and characteristics of waste streams emanating from chemical and related industries are reviewed as the basis for developing appropriate abatement and treatment strategies. Treatment processes utilizing individual operations as well as integrated systems of physical, chemical and biological treatment are covered. Treatment process designs and sensitivity analyses of alternatives are undertaken for case studies involving industrial solid, liquid and gaseous wastes. Canadian guidelines and regulations are presented and implemented within the context of environmental and human health. (0/0/0/30/12)

PREREQUISITES: CHEE 221 or MINE 221, or permission of the department.

Objectives and Outcomes

The principal objective of the course is to provide students with the necessary tools to understand and evaluate physical, chemical and biological waste treatment processes. The students will learn how to apply engineering principles to the estimation and evaluation of unit operations associated with waste treatment processes, and ultimately to analyze the efficiency of applicable treatment solutions.

Specific course learning outcomes (CLO) include:

  1. Identify environmental and human health issues related to waste treatment processes.
  2. Determine the parameters necessary to characterize waste streams and processes associated with their physical, biological and chemical treatment.
  3. Analyze waste streams, design appropriate process flow diagrams and estimate appropriate size of unit operations required to meet applicable standards.
  4. Apply sound engineering principles to evaluate and select appropriate abatement strategies and treatment methods to specific case studies.
  5. Justify selected waste treatment strategies and analyze their strengths and limitations with respect to current guidelines, standards and regulations.

This course assesses the following attributes:

Knowledge Base (CLO 2, 3)

CHEE-KB-BIO-2:  Applies foundations of science, materials science, and engineering in biological, physiological, pharmaceutical and/or environmental problems or processes.

Professionalism (CLO 5)

CHEE-PRO-3:  Integrates appropriate standards, codes, legal and regulatory factors into decision making, while considering protection of the public and public interest in decision making and recommendations.

Impact of Engineering (CLO 1, 4)

CHEE-IM-1:  Assesses reliability, risk, regulatory compliance and safety and takes appropriate action to mitigate social and/or environmental impacts.

Relevance to the Program

Course Structure and Activities

One 2 hour and two 1 hour classes per week.  These periods will be used for lectures, exams, workshops and tutorials as posted on the course website.  Please refer to SOLUS for times and locations.

Resources

Primary textbook: Principles of Environmental Engineering and Science by Davis and Masten, 3rd Ed. McGraw Hill (2014), or the available paperback courseware, which includes selections from this textbook and is available at campus bookstore (referred to as D&M).

Additional reference materials: these resources may be useful as additional references, but students are not required to have their own copies:

  • Environmental Chemistry 4th Ed., by Baird and Cann (or previous editions) Freeman (2008); (referred to as B&C)
  • Wastewater Engineering – Treatment and Resource Recovery, 5th Ed., by Metcalf & Eddy / AECOM (or previous editions) McGraw Hill (2014); (referred to as M&E)

All course lecture slides, assignments and tutorials will be posted online. If you are registered for the course, you can access this information by logging in to the LMS.
Selected scientific articles pertaining to the mitigation of industrial pollution will be identified as required reading during the term. These articles will be available online. Their contents will be discussed during the course and may be tested on the final exam.
TAs and instructor are available for consultation on an open-door policy (appointment by e-mail is recommended).